Donations for 2017

I have finally caught up with the people involved in the Martyr Road and Waterloo Avenue house fires and presented to them their cheques.

The first photo relates to Janine and John Thompson-Stokell, (Waterloo Ave), and the other is of Nina Hellicare, (Martyr Road).

Each family received $1200 towards their endeavour to get their lives back on track. We wish them all the best and let them know that the club is proud to have helped in their time of need.

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Janine and John Thompson-Stokell, (Waterloo Ave)

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Nina Hellicare, (Martyr Road)

With the payment of these cheques the Club has donated just on $14,500 to worthy recipients since 2010.

 

2017 Christmas Party Photos

I’m sorry everybody. I had this post done the day after the party but for some reason it never actually arrived at the website. My apologies. Enjoy reliving the moments of frivolity.

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Christmas 2017 table arrangements.

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Tony from the Warburton Golf Club and Shirley setting up.

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Annie setting up the plant prizes for this year.

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The set up team Shirley, Annie and Jose

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Lovely set up at the Warburton Golf Club rooms and what a beautiful view.

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All done and ready to rock-n-roll. Lets get the show on the road.

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Welcome everyone.

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We had 12 tables of 8 set up around the main dining/club room.

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A beautifully cooked spit roast. The caterers did a great job.

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The salad table. All lovely.

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Eat up Bob!

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Pauline and Joseph

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Barbara got second pick in the lucky door prizes.

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The hyderangeas were a big hit and were the first to go.

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Who’s a happy prize winner – Megan the rock-n-roll queen.

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Lucky pair Sue and Penny with their prizes

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Happy winner Leonie with her geranium.

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Another winner Graham Hughes.

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Denise peeping through her Dogwood prize.

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Pauline with her beautiful hyderangea prize.

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Winners Russell and Gillian Brown

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Joy’s life Membership presentation.

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Members draw – Sunil started all this. Michael Keck was the last winner for this year.

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Save the last dance for me! Jose and Graham – the old knees and shoulders are not what they used to be but life is still great.

August 2017 Meeting

Luke Whiteside – Grafting Fruit Trees

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Luke has had an interesting career as a school chaplain and pastor, and latterly as president of the Yarra Valley Bee Group and cultivator of heritage fruit trees. Main points of his talk:

Horticulturalists may increase plants either by sexual reproduction (pollination and seed formation) or asexual reproduction (grafting, cutting, layering, division, bedding and tissue culture). The advantages of sexual reproduction are that it is quick, economical and easy, but produces offspring that are genetically diverse, i.e. not necessarily true to the parent. Asexual methods produce clones of the parent plant but are generally more labour-intensive.

Grafting is the joining together of the cambium (growing) layers of the scion (top of the plant) and the rootstock. This gives the possibility of combining the best attributes of two different, but genetically related, plants to produce a superior new plant. It is particularly suitable for fruit trees and has been the means of retaining certain heritage varieties which might otherwise be lost because they are of no commercial value. It has also been useful for the home gardener in enabling the one tree to produce a variety of fruits that ripen at different times, thus extending the harvest season and reducing the need for cold storage and/or transport.

There are a number of different grafting methods using different complementary shapes for joining together the the scion and the rootstock when the two are of comparable size: wedge, splice, whip-and-tongue, and approach grafting; less common and used when the scion is significantly smaller than the rootstock are cleft, side, notch and bark inlay grafting. Budding is a similar technique except that a bud is used instead of the scion.

Tools needed: grafting knife, grafting tape, wax, Clonex rooting hormone (used in very dilute solution to stimulate cell growth).

Important:

  • Plants must be related to each other (same genus or same family);
  • Tools must be disinfected to avoid transferring any diseases such as apple mosaic virus;
  • Plant samples are usually best collected during dormancy;
  • Drying out of plant parts can be prevented by using ziplock bags for collecting them;
  • Graftable plants include maples and fruit trees such as apples, quinces, plums etc.
  • There will be a grafting workshop at ECOSS next July, run by Neil Barraclough.
  • Reference: Dave Wilson in Nursery Educational Video series.

Ancient Greek proverb –

A society grows great when old men plant trees, whose shade they will never sit in.